banner_1-1_edited.jpg

BLOG

  • Sustainable Queen

IS PLASTIC EVIL?



Most people are aware of how plastic contributes to climate change. It’s polluting landfills, killing marine life, and harming the ecosystem.

While there’s no denying plastic is a significant problem for the environment, it’s not simple to get rid of it completely. Below are some of the surprising benefits of plastic that you shouldknow.


Primary Form of Packaging


Plastic is a lightweight and cost-efficient form of packaging. While this material is not inherently evil, improper management of plastic waste is.

Strong, lightweight plastics can actually contribute to sustainability in many different ways. Unlike other materials, plastic requires fewer resources to create.

If we replace plastic packaging with alternative materials, it will increase the amount of energy used and greenhouse gases emitted.


Food Preservation


Plastics are used to pack, store, serve, and deliver food and beverages. This material is chosen precisely because it is considered inert and chemically resistant to the outside environment.


With a global food supply chain, pathogens can find their way around large swaths of the population. The mass packaging of food is an important barrier against microbiological contamination.


By using plastic, people can safely eat food from more places and for longer periods of time. It also helps keep the food separate from other products and prevents the ripening effect.


Battle Against Malnutrition


Aside from storing and preserving food, plastic plays a critical role in the battle against malnutrition in developing countries. People in these countries are less likely to consume enough fruit and vegetables.


According to the World Health Organization, about 1.7 million deaths globally can be attributed to low fruit and vegetable consumption. More communities could possibly suffer from malnutrition if plastic was not so pervasive for preserving food.






Previous: What Is the 1.5 Degree Climate Target?


Next: Upcycling, Downcycling, and Recycling: What’s the Difference?